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Featured Falcon: Angie Morales

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Featured Falcon: Angie Morales

Chandler Goldreyer, Staff Writer

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Leaving everything behind for a new place can be hard.

Senior Angie Morales is someone who knows how that feels because she and her family moved to the United States from Maracaibo, Venezuela in 2013.

“I was born and raised in Venezuela,” Morales said. “I came here almost 5 years ago in search of a better future.”

Clearly, the action of doing something as impactful as moving from Venezuela to the United States is a memorable experience.

“The moving experience was exciting, to be honest,” Morales said. “I was excited to learn English because I had always liked the language. But, of course, I was scared of starting a new school. It was my first time moving schools. I remember everything, from the drive to the airport to my first day of school.”

Moving to a new place and moving into a new home are the two big parts of moving. The process of getting there, the process of settling into a new place, and the process of taking it in, all while trying to live your “normal” life can be a pretty wild experience.

“The whole trip from Venezuela to Houston took like a whole day,” Morales said. “It was so tiring. We got to our new home and I was already impressed because everything was so different: the houses, the streets, the people. Then school started in like two weeks, so the first two weeks were literally my family running around, you know, settling in, buying stuff for the house and our school materials. Before I knew it, school started the next day.”

Starting school in the U.S. was a milestone for Angie. It’s just one day, but everyone’s first day of school is pretty important. The first day of school in a new country is also very important.

“Oh my god, my first day, I cried,” Morales said. “Like, I literally cried because I was terrified of not understanding anything around me, because I didn’t speak English back then. I walked in and I had to go get my schedule and there was a teacher who helped me with everything, and I later found out she was my teacher for ESL [English as a Second Language] which was the class where I learned to speak English. Then, I don’t know, the day just went by and it wasn’t as bad as I had thought, honestly.”

Moving, settling in, and going on a first day of school are pretty interesting. All that stuff that happens right after moving. Things can be hard. It can also be hard before the move. When Angie found out she was going to move, she had some concerns.

“When I found out I was moving, I think the hardest problem I faced was the difference of language,” Morales said. “I didn’t speak English at all, and I found out I was moving like 3 or 4 months before it actually happened. I knew I wasn’t going to be able to learn it that fast—it would be impossible.”

She did learn it very quickly, though. It took her about a school year to become fluent in English. Once she had gotten here and settled in, a lot of her concerns subsided.

“Now I got used to living here and I like it so much,” Morales said. “I really miss living in Venezuela, though.”

Part of how she keeps pieces of Venezuela close is by keeping in touch with old friends and family, and FaceTiming them a lot. While she’s fluent in both English and Spanish, she mostly speaks Spanish at home so she doesn’t forget it.

“I do celebrate my Venezuelan heritage, but not as much as I used to, I guess,” Morales said. “There’s this thing, it’s kind of a like a festival for Venezuelan culture that I go to every year, so yeah, you could say I do!”

Living in the U.S., Morales started learning about other cultures as well.

“I like it here, and it’s nice,” Morales said. “I like how everything is so diverse and I’ve learned about so many different cultures. My group of friends is literally people from different parts of the world: Argentina, Colombia, Mexico, Ukraine, Germany, Brazil, and even more Venezuelans! My friends and I always joke around about saving money and traveling to each one of our home countries so we can better understand where we all came from.” Morales said.

The things Morales has learned and connections she has made since moving to the U.S. have made her family’s life-changing decision worthwhile. Though the experience of moving had its ups and downs, it turns out that moving to the United States was definitely a choice she does not regret.

“If you have the opportunity to move to a different country or even a state, do it,” Morales said. “I think it’s a great experience and you learn so much. My experience in the U.S. as a foreign person has been amazing. I like it and I wouldn’t take it back.”

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Chandler Goldreyer, Staffer

My name is Chandler Goldreyer and I’m a staff writer for the Foster Flyer. I’m a senior and I’m an active member of the Foster High School Choir....

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